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producers take in oxygen during photosynthesis

When Photosynthesis occurs it takes in the co2 from the atmosphere and releases oxygen as a bi product....

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Photosynthesis, Cellular Respiration, and Fermentation

During the process of photosynthesis, carbon dioxide plus water in the presence of sunlight, enzymes and chlorophyll produce glucose and oxygen as waste product.

Then why do the plants get rid of all the oxygen they produce during photosynthesis

Deep-ocean currents, , do not seem to have existed during supercontinental times, and atmospheric oxygen was likely only a few percent at most when the Cryogenian Period began. Canfield’s ocean-oxygenation evidence partly came from testing sulfur isotopes. As with , , and other elements, life prefers the lighter isotope of sulfur, and are two stable isotopes that can be easily tested in sediments. Canfield proposed that in pre-Cryogenian oceanic depths, , which are among Earth’s earliest life forms and produce as its waste product, abounded. Hydrogen sulfide gives rotten eggs their distinctive aroma and is highly toxic to plants and animals, as it . Hydrogen sulfide would react with dissolved iron to form iron pyrite and settle out in the ocean floor, just as the iron oxide did that formed the BIFs. The sulfate-reducing bacteria will enrich the sulfur-32/34 ratio by 3% and did so before the Cryogenian, but the Ediacaran iron pyrite sediments showed a 5% enrichment. A persuasive explanation is recycling sulfur in the oceanic ecosystem, which can only happen in the presence of oxygen.

photosynthesis and cellular respiration take place ..

In summary, today’s orthodox late-Proterozoic hypothesis is that the complex dynamics of a supercontinent breakup somehow triggered . The global glaciation was reversed by runaway effects primarily related to an immense increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. During the events, oceanic life would have been delivered vast amounts of continental nutrients scoured from the rocks by glaciers, and the hot conditions would have combined to create a global explosion of photosynthetic life. A billion years of relative equilibrium between prokaryotes and eukaryotes was ultimately shattered, and oxygen levels began rising during the Cryogenian and Ediacaran periods toward modern levels. Largely sterilized oceans, which began to be oxygenated at depth for the first time, are now thought to have prepared the way for what came next: the rise of complex life.

A free radical is an atom, molecule, or ion with an unpaired valence electron or an unfilled shell, and thus seeks to capture an electron. The used to create ATP in a mitochondrion leaks electrons, which creates free radicals, which will take that electron from wherever they can get it. creates some of the most dangerous free radicals, particularly the . The more hydroxyl radicals created, the more damage inflicted on neighboring molecules. Another free radical created by that electron leakage is , which can be neutralized by , but there is no avoiding the damage produced by the hydroxyl radical. Those kinds of free radicals are called (“ROS”). ROS are not universally deleterious to life processes, but if their production spins out of control, the oxidative stress inflicted by the ROS can cripple biological structures. ROS damage can cause programmed cell death, called , which is a maintenance process for complex life. Antioxidants are one way that organisms defend against oxidative stress, and is a standard antioxidant. Antioxidants usually serve multiple purposes in cellular chemistry, and antioxidant supplements generally do not work as advertised. They not only do not target the reactions that might be beneficial to prevent, but they can interfere with reactions that are necessary for life processes. Antioxidant supplements are blunt instruments that can cause more harm than good.

primary producers of oxygen on ..

There is also evidence that life itself can contribute to mass extinctions. When the eventually , organisms that could not survive or thrive around oxygen (called ) . When anoxic conditions appeared, particularly when existed, the anaerobes could abound once again, and when thrived, usually arising from ocean sediments, they . Since the ocean floor had already become anoxic, the seafloor was already a dead zone, so little harm was done there. The hydrogen sulfide became lethal when it rose in the and killed off surface life and then wafted into the air and near shore. But the greatest harm to life may have been inflicted when hydrogen sulfide eventually , which could have been the final blow to an already stressed ecosphere. That may seem a fanciful scenario, but there is evidence for it. There is fossil evidence of during the Permian extinction, as well as photosynthesizing anaerobic bacteria ( and ), which could have only thrived in sulfide-rich anoxic surface waters. Peter Ward made this key evidence for his , and he has implicated hydrogen sulfide events in most major mass extinctions. An important aspect of Ward’s Medea hypothesis work is that about 1,000 PPM of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, which might be reached in this century if we keep burning fossil fuels, may artificially induce Canfield Oceans and result in . Those are not wild-eyed doomsday speculations, but logical outcomes of current trends and , proposed by leading scientists. Hundreds of already exist on Earth, which are primarily manmade. Even if those events are “only” 10% likely to happen in the next century, that we are flirting with them at all should make us shudder, for a few reasons, one of which is the awesome damage that it would inflict on the biosphere, including humanity, and another is that it is entirely preventable with the use of technologies .

The dates are controversial, but it appears that after hundreds of millions of years of using various molecules as electron donors for photosynthesis, began to split water to get the donor electron, and oxygen was the waste byproduct. Cyanobacterial colonies are dated to as early as 2.8 bya, and it is speculated that may have appeared as early as 3.5 bya and then spread throughout the oceans. Those cyanobacterial colonies formed the first fossils in the geologic record, called . At Shark Bay in Australia and some other places the water is too saline to support animals that can eat cyanobacteria, and give us a glimpse into early life on Earth.

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    how plants take in carbon dioxide and release oxygen during the process of photosynthesis

  • producers release the gas OXYGEN as a product of photosynthesis

    Photosynthesis

  • Carbon dioxide is used during photosynthesis

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What does photosynthesis produces

works for animals that are no more than a couple of millimeters thick, but for larger animals a respiration system was necessary. The rise of the arthropods has been an enduring problem for paleobiologists. Why was the arthropod so successful, particularly in the beginning? Segmented animals dominated Cambrian seas, and segmentation provides for repeated features. Segments obviously became important for locomotion but, for arthropods, segmentation appears to have conferred the more important advantage of distributed oxygen absorption. Each trilobite leg had an attached gill, and leg motion constantly drew fresh oxygenated water over each gill. Arthropods never developed the kinds of lungs that vertebrates have, or the pump gills of fish and other aquatic animals. Early arthropods breathed by moving their legs. Peter Ward’s recent hypothesis is that segments were first used for respiration, to provide a large gill surface area, and using the segments for locomotion came later. For trilobites, the same functionality that pushed water over gills was also coopted for food intake. Also, the leg-mounted gill was necessary because of an arthropod’s body armor; oxygen could not be absorbed through tough exoskeletons.

What is made during photosynthesis?

In the earliest days of life on Earth, it had to solve the problems of how to reproduce, how to separate itself from its environment, how to acquire raw materials, and how to make the chemical reactions that it needed. But it was confined to those areas where it could take advantage of briefly available potential energy as . The earliest process of skimming energy from energy gradients to power life is called respiration. That earliest respiration is today called because there was virtually no free oxygen in the atmosphere or ocean in those early days. Respiration was life’s first energy cycle. A biological energy cycle begins by harvesting an energy gradient (usually by a proton crossing a membrane or, in photosynthesis, directly capturing photon energy), and the acquired energy powered chemical reactions. The cycle then proceeds in steps, and the reaction products of each step sequentially use a little more energy from the initial capture until the initial energy has been depleted and the cycle’s molecules are returned to their starting point and ready for a fresh influx of energy to repeat the cycle.

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It can be helpful at this juncture to grasp the cumulative impact of , inventing , inventing , inventing that made possible, and inventing . Pound-for-pound, the complex organisms that began to dominate Earth’s ecosphere during the Cambrian Period consumed energy about 100,000 times as fast as the Sun produced it. Life on Earth is an incredibly energy-intensive phenomenon, powered by sunlight. In the end, only so much sunlight reaches Earth, and it has always been life’s primary limiting variable. Photosynthesis became more efficient, aerobic respiration was an order-of-magnitude leap in energy efficiency, the oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans allowed animals to colonize land and ocean sediments and even fly, and life’s colonization of land allowed for a . Life could exploit new niches and even help create them, but the key innovations and pioneering were achieved long ago. If humanity attains the , new niches will arise, even of the , but all other creatures living on Earth have constraints, primarily energy constraints, which produce very real limits. Life on Earth has largely been a for several hundred million years, but the Cambrian Explosion was one of those halcyonic times when animal life had its greatest expansion, not built on the bones of a mass extinction so much as blazing new trails.

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